Friday, May 12, 2017

Relief of families of soldiers

In the province of Wellington, in March, 1855, for the relief of families of soldiers ordered to the Crimea, £1848 10s 2d was subscribed, £1000 of which was remitted to the English Patriotic Fund, and the balance for the relief of soldiers. The ladies of Wellington, in addition, collected £1000 for providing additional nurses and hospital necessaries for the sick and wounded of the allied armies.
Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXVII, Issue 8868, 16 June 1900

Sunday, February 1, 2015

James Black

James Black

Crimean Veteran's Death.
A Crimean veteran, Mr. James Black, died at the Mangonui Hospital, after a short illness, aged 92 years. He had been a bluejacket, and had served under Admiral Sir Charles Napier in the Crimean War. The funeral look place at Kaitaia on Sunday afternoon. The coffin, which was draped with the Union Jack, was carried to the grave by a detachment of the Mangonui Mounted Rifles, under Lieutenant Hoskin. The Rev. A. Drake conducted the burial service.
 New Zealand Herald, Volume LVI, Issue 17116, 22 March 1919, Page 10

Saturday, January 24, 2015

James Kerr

James Kerr
Alma, Inkermann, Sebastopol and Balaclava.
born circa 1834
died 1 March 1879, Temuka, South Canterbury, New Zealand aged 45 years
reg. 1879/5235
buried Addington Cemetery, Christchurch, plot number: 148C

Ann Williams Bartlett

Death of Sergeant-Major Kerr.
A very serious and melancholy accident, attended with fatal results, happened to Staff Sergt.-Major Kerr, near Temuka, on Thursday afternoon. He had hired a buggy at Nicholas' livery stable, Temuka, and was driving out to Winchester to superintend the firing of the Temuka Volunteers for the district prizes when the accident occurred.

Several people noticed that the horse was going along the main road of Temuka at an unusual pace, and swerving from side to side as if it had got beyond the control of the driver. On nearing a part of the road known us Wheelband's corner, it is supposed that one of the wheels of the buggy came in contact with a large stone, as it was seen to bound upwards and throw the Sergeant-Major out on the road, where he fell heavily on his head. 

The horse then turned the corner sharp and overturned the buggy, breaking one of the shafts. Mr Wheelband and two others who saw the accident ran to Mr Kerr's assistance and picked him up. They discovered that he had a bruise on the head, and was quite insensible. Dr Hayes was sent for, and he arrived promptly and had the unfortunate man conveyed to the Royal Hotel, where, with the assistance of Dr Rayner, honorary surgeon to the Temuka Volunteers, he received every attention.

The patient had severe concussion of the brain, and he remained insensible during the whole of the night. It was thought that there was a possibility of his regaining consciousness, but death intervened at about 5 o'clock this morning. Deceased was quite insensible from the time of the accident till his death. The occurrence gave quite a shock to the people of Temuka.

Sergeant-Major Kerr leaves a wife and eight or ten children in Christchurch. He had done a great deal of service in his time, having been through the Crimean war and in the Indian mutiny. He was much respected in Christchurch and Lyttelton, and indeed in all other places where he was called upon to do duty as a Volunteer officer. An inquest on the body will be held at Temuka to-day.
Star, Issue 3398, 1 March 1879, Page 4


Star, Issue 3398, 1 March 1879, Page 3

Death of Sergeant-Major Kerr. 
We regret to learn that Staff Sergeant-Major Kerr died at five o'clock yesterday morning at the Royal Hotel, Temuka, from the injuries he received in the accident of the previous day.

Drs Hayes and Rayner did all that surgical skill could suggest, to ameliorate his condition, but their best efforts proved unavailing, the deceased never having recovered consciousness, and he breathed his last at the above-mentioned hour.

Staff Sergeant-Major Kerr was 45 years of age, and his death has cast quite a gloom over the township of Temuka, and indeed the whole district, where, owing to his connection with the Volunteer corps, he was well-known and highly respected.

His connection with the Imperial army was an eventful one. He was for fourteen years in the Royal Artillery in Captain Massey's battery, and went through, the whole of the Crimean war, taking part in the battles of Alma, Inkermann, Sebastopool [sic], and Balaclava. In these engagements he distinguished himself, and received the English Crimean medal with four bars and the Turkish Order of Medjijie [Medjidie].

He came to New Zealand with his battery during the war, and received the New Zealand war medal. He obtained his discharge in the Colony about ten years ago, and since that time has filled the post of Drill Inspector to the Artillery Volunteers in the Canterbury district, in which capacity he earned the esteem and regard of all who knew him.

He leaves a wife and nine children to mourn his loss. Mrs Kerr and his eldest daughter arrived from Christchurch yesterday, and were met at the Railway Station by Dr Rayner and Captain Young, who had the painful duty of breaking the sad news to them.

An inquest will be held to-day at Temuka, after which the deceased will, be removed to Christchurch for burial, probably by the express train, in which case a party of the C Battery, N.Z.A. will escort the body to the railway station, and a number of the T.A.V. Cadets will join the cortege.

We should mention that the late Sergeant-Major won four medals in all, those above enumerated, and a fourth, the name of which we are unable to learn.
Timaru Herald, Volume XXX, Issue 1387, 1 March 1879, Page 2

Turkish Order of the Medjidie

The Inquest. An inquest on the body of Sergeant-Major Kerr was held at the Royal Hotel, Temuka, on Saturday, before A. Le G. Campbell, Esq., Coroner, and a jury, of whom Alex. Wilson was chosen foreman. The facts elicited in evidence were substantially the same as already reported, and the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death."

After the inquest the body of deceased was followed to the railway station by a large number of volunteers from Temuka, Winchester, and Timaru, most of whom went by the express train, which conveyed the body to Christchurch, so as to be present at its interment.  

The Funeral.
The funeral took place yesterday afternoon, and was marked by the customary military honours. The procession was announced to leave for the Presbyterian Church, Addington, at 3 o'clock, and prior to that hour all the headquarters companies of Volunteers, as well as the No. 5 Canterbury Rifles and Constabulary, paraded at the drillshed under the general direction of Captain J. Cr. Hawkes. The Artillery Company, was in charge of Captain Craig, the Engineers under Lieut. Woolf, City Guards under Lieut. Perran, Christchurch Cadets under Captain Johnson, Constabulary under Supt. Hickson, and the Fire Brigade under Supt. Harris. The members of the Masonic Lodges of Christchurch and Lyttelton, and members of the Oddfellows' Order, and a large number of citizens and friends were also in waiting at the drillshed.

Precisely at 3 o'clock the coffin, covered with the Union Jack and bearing the busby, sword and accoutrements of the late Sergt.-Major, was brought out from the Artillery orderly room and placed on a gun  carriage.

The procession then moved slowly away from tho Drillshed in the following order:- Toomer's and the Yeomanry Cavalry Bands gun-carriage, drawn by two horses, and driven by artillery gunners; mourning carriage; Artillery Company (with arms reversed); Engineers City Guards No. 5 Company Canterbury Rifles; Cadets; Constabulary; Masonic, and other Friendly Societies; Fire Brigade, and general public.

The cortege moved up Cashel street, Oxford Terrace, and Lincoln road, towards the Addington Cemetery, the Bands playing the Dead March in Saul the while. As the procession passed through the streets named, every spare foot of ground was covered by those eager to see or take part in the mournful proceedings, and the cortege, before reaching its destination, assumed larger proportions than has been known in Christchurch for some time past.

At the Cemetery gate, the Volunteers and Constabulary turned inwards, and the coffin, borne by some members of the Battery of which the deceased was Sergeant Major, and headed by the Rev C. Fraser was conveyed down the lane to the grave, prepared for its reception. The Rev C. Fraser very impressively conducted the burial service, which was listened to attentively by an immense congregation of people. The customary three volleys were fired over the body, which was then lowered into the grave, and the mournful ceremony terminated.

Star, Issue 3399, 3 March 1879, Page 3

family of James and Ann Williams Kerr:

1. Annie Kerr (eldest daughter) married 25 March 1881 at "Inkermann Cottage" St Albans, by the Rev. D. Bruce, Edwin Clark of Rakaia.

2. James Charles Kerr, born circa 1864, reg. 1864/21032, died 15 October 1893, Melbourne aged 29 years

3. Catherine Kerr born circa 1866, reg. 1866/15042 

4. Christina Kerr (third daughter) born circa 1868, reg. 1868/27777, married 30 March 1887 at the residence of the bride's sister, Union Street, Dunedin by the Rev. Dr. Stuart, Henry Trott, Esq. Springston Canterbury, late of Somerset, England   

? 5. George Bartlett Kerr born circa 1869, reg 1869/29849

6. Elizabeth Frances Kerr (fourth daughter), born 25 October 1871 Lyttelton, reg. 1871/11521, married 30 June 1891 at the Alford Forest Hotel, Henry Thomas Knight, eldest son of Henry Knight of Alford Forest.

7. Margaret Ellen Kerr, died about 28 March 1873, buried Addington Cemetery, plot number 148A

8. Dixon Major Kerr, born at "Inkermann Cottage" St Albans, Christchurch 18 April 1874, reg. 1874/28426, died circa 1954 aged 80 years, buried Bromley Cemetery, married 1901 Mabel Elizabeth Compton, born circa 1873, New Zealand, died 2 June 1954, buried Bromley Cemetery.
          a. William Dixon Kerr, born circa 1902, reg. 1902/3474 died 1965 aged 63 years, married 1929, Elizabeth Ella Habgood Sabiston
          b. Henry James Kerr, born circa 1903, reg. 1903/19949 died 1970, married Vera May Caesar
          c. Kathleen May Kerr born circa 1904, reg. 1904/632 
          d. Eric George Kerr, born circa 1905, reg. 1905/18900, found drowned at Sumner in 1928 aged 22 years 
          e. Leslie Francis Kerr, born circa 1908, reg. 1908/14907 
          f. Trevor Patrick Kerr, born circa 1914, reg. 1914/5216

9. Edward Richard Kerr born 6 December 1875, St Albans, reg. 1875/14359

10. Joan Kerr (Tottie), born circa 1877, Christchurch, reg. 1877/2144, died about 22 March 1910, buried Addington Cemetery plot number 148B, aged 32 years married 3 June 1909 by the Rev N. Turner, at residence of Mrs Kerr, Bealey Ave., Christchurch, Charles Henry Preece (tailor), son of John Preece and Emma Pugh.

11. Emily Kerr (seventh daughter) born 2 October 1878 "Inkermann Cottage" St Albans, reg. 1878/8995, died at "Inkermann Cottage" St Albans aged 18 days, buried Addington Cemetery, plot number 148A.


James Kerr's widow married secondly 22 December 1884 at Christchurch Phillip Tisch, he died sometime before July 1892, Ann Tisch, formerly Kerr died 6 December 1900 at the residence of her daughter, 25 Gloucester Street, Linwood, buried Addington Cemetery.

Press, Volume XXXI, Issue 4253, 17 March 1879, Page 3

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

James Culley

James Culley also known as James Blake served during the whole Crimean campaign, being at Alma, Balaclava and Inkerman and taking part in the siege of Sebastopol. As a private in the Scotch Fusiliers, Blake was an eye witness to the famous Charge of the Light Brigade. After being wounded he was repatriated to England where he soon recovered. He tried to return to the war but was turned down twice. When he applied again under the name of James Culley he was accepted and sent out to serve with British forces in India and thereafter to New Zealand as part of the Police force. He ended up farming at Papatawa near Woodville, and although never married reputedly had descendants. He died aged 75 and his funeral procession went through the main street of Woodville on 18 September 1907.

Woodville Pioneer Museum

William Pethern Hartstone

WILLIAM PETHERN HARTSTONE, aged 15, was on board Exmouth  at the bombardment of Sebastopol. The captain took the ship too close and the ship suffered heavy damage and casualties. Afterwards he sailed to New Zealand and took part in the Taranaki wars (1860-1861) where he was wounded in the leg by a blow from a tomahawk resulting in a permanent limp. Hartstone arrived in Woodville in 1889 and took over the cheese factory. He died in 1924.

Woodville Pioneer Museum

Friday, April 18, 2014


Andrews, William
Armstrong, Frederick Gerard
Ashton, John
Austin, Captain
Bales, Edward
Bezar, Edwin
Bishop, Thomas
Boxall, William
Brown, Malcolm
Burningham, Stainer Henry
Captain Hyde
Carley, Joseph
Carson, James
Choat, William
Clark, William
Collyer, George
Connor, William
Cornelius, Richard Longfield
Corrigan, Samuel
Crawford, James Archer
Crozier, William
Davies, Selwyn
Davis, Sydney Herbert
Dewe, Richard
Docherty, Francis
Donaghy, John
Donovan, Timothy
Duffy, Francis
Dunn, John
Emerson, John
Fanning, Thomas
Fenton, John James
Forrest, James
Fox, Michael
Gardiner, John
Giles, Dr. Joseph
Gill, Michael
Grace, J.
Graham, John William
Graham, Robert
Gudsell, Thomas
Handley, Henry Edwards
Harkin, William
Harper, Robert
Hayward, George
Hazell, George
Hewstone, Henry James
Hobday, James
Hogan, George V.
Holliday, William
Howitt, Hill
Jeffcott, Charles
Kapatzo, John
Kedzlie, John
Kennedy, Joseph
Kirk, Alexander
Kneller, James
Lacy, Robert
Last Surviving Veterans
Le Cree, Charles
Linn, James
Lowden, Thomas
Lowe, John
Mackay, Peter
Mackinnon, W. A.
Maloney, Stephen
Martin, Richard Robinson
McBain, John
McComish, James
McFarlane, Andrew
McGarry, Jacob
McLeod, Robert
McPherson, James
Mee, Alexander
Menary, Henry
Menzies, Dr Edward
Moody, William Henry
Moore, Martin
Morley, Joseph
Murray, Henry
Mutton, Daniel
O'Connell, W
Perrin, John
Piper, John
Reid, George
Richards, Thomas 
Rodger, John
Russell, R. T. B.
Ryland, William Charles
Salt, James
Sandbrook, James
Sanders, Frederic de Veuille
Schaw, Henry
Scott, Mark
Sebastopol Day - 8 September 1900
Shepherd, W. C.
Smith, Angus
Smith, John
Smith, William
Soler, John
Spencer, William Isaac
Stagpoole, Bartholomew
Storey, James
Stringer, Joseph Henry
Sullivan, Daniel
Swan, Peter Penman
Tattersall, Mary
Temple, Edwyn Frederick
Tucker, Thomas
Tunks, Captain
Tyler, James
Un-named Crimean Veteran
Wales, William
Warner, R.
Whelan, Patrick
Willis, James
Wilson, John
Wilson, Samuel
Wiltshire, George

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Blake, Valentine

Press, Volume XLIII, Issue 6541, 9 September 1886, Page 3

A well-known and esteemed resident of Richmond, Mr Valentine Blake, died at his residence on North Avon road last night, Mr Blake, who was a nephew of the late Sir Thomas Blake, of Menlough Castle, County Galway, enlisted in the Royal Horse Artillery at the age of sixteen, after which he served in the 17th Lancers, and then joined the 17th Regiment of Infantry (the Leicestershire Regiment). While in the Army he took part in the Crimean campaign, and was wounded. Retiring from the service with the rank of sergeant, he came to New Zealand, arriving here in November, 1857. He lived in the Richmond district for the past thirty-five years, and was greatly respected. Mr Blake leaves a widow, two daughters, and one son.
Press, Volume LVI, Issue 10508, 21 November 1899, Page 6

Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Tattersall, Mary

Mary Tattersall was the daughter of Leeds brewer and was one of the paid lady nurses. She had been a district visitor, and then trained for three weeks at Westminster before going to Scutarti. on receiving her first pay, she sent the Westminster 5 pounds with a letter. She wanted to donate some of the first money she ever earned, she said, to the hospital where she received so much kindness as a student. Tattersall's untiring industry, her flinching from no menial employment, 'her truth, judgement, faithfulness, discretion & entire trustworthiness, her temperance in all things, even in flirting & her high religious principles earned Nightingale's respect and esteem. She was  a superb worker. Nevertheless Nightingale did not use her for patient care, but as cook and housekeeper for the female staff of the Scutari General Hospital. Source: Nursing at the Crossroads, Part 1. Nursing Before Nightingale, 1815-1899
By Carol Helmstadter, Judith Godden   

d. 1893 Tattersall  Mary  70Y

Grey River Argus, 20 September 1893, Page 2
DEATH. Tattersall — On the 19th September at the Grey River Hospital, Mary Tattersall, native of Headingley, Leeds, England, and late of Greymouth, aged 70 years.

Evening Post, 2 May 1944, Page 8
A link between Greymouth and the Crimean War has been established by the discovery of the grave in the Greymouth cemetery of Miss Mary Tattersall, one of the original Florence Nightingale nurses. The daughter of a country clergyman in England, Miss Tattersall went to the Crimea with Florence Nightingale after her fiancé had been killed in action. At the end of her service she came to New Zealand and resided at Greymouth, where for about 30 years she was a professional nurse. In a letter to the matron of the Grey Hospital (Miss N. Moffatt). Mr. William Noy, a former resident of Greymouth, recalled that in 1895 Miss Tattersall was buried at Greymouth. Steps have been taken by the Registered Nurses' Association to restore the grave.
1865 - Miss Mary Tattersall resigned as matron, Timaru Hospital 13 Dec.
Timaru Herald, 26 January 1866, Page 2
SAILED. January 20 — Geelong, p.s., 137 tons, Hart, for Lyttelton, via intermediate ports. Passengers—Miss Beswick and Miss Tattersall.
Lyttelton Times, 22 January 1866, Page 4 Shipping
LYTTELTON. arrived. Jan. 21— Geolong, p.s., 137 tons, Hart, from Dunedin, via intermediate ports. Passengers - Miss Beswick, Miss Tattersall, Mr. Scarborough.

Austin, Captain

Dunedin, July 20 
Captain Austin, an old resident in the Lakes District, died suddenly. He had served in the Crimean and New Zealand wars.

Timaru Herald, Volume XLV, Issue 3989, 21 July 1887, Page 2

Le Cree, Charles


Otago Witness 1 July 1903, Page 52
 A travelling tinker named Charles Le Cree, better known as "Peg- leg," was found dead on the Winchester road, near Geraldine, Canterbury, on Friday night. When found the body was warm, and there was a cut on each side of the forehead. At the inquest on Saturday it was stated that a vehicle without lights had passed along the road shortly before the body was found. The jury returned an open verdict that deceased was found dead, but there was nothing to show the cause of death. Deceased was supposed to be about 84 years of age, and was known on the roads from one end of the colony to the other. He was a Frenchman, had been in New Zealand for over 30 years, and is said to have seen service in the Crimean and Maori wars.  
Reference 35850
Surname Le Gee 
Forenames Charles 
Address No Plot Record 
Age at Death 68 Years 
Date of Death Sunday, 28 June 1903
Date of Interment Sunday, 28 June 1903
Cemetery Geraldine Cemetery 
Section Unknown
New Row 0 
New Plot 403 

Temple, Edwyn Frederick

Timaru Herald , 24 June 1920, Page 6
DEATH. TEMPLE.-—On June 23rd, at his residence, Wai-iti Road. Edwyn Frederick Temple (late Captain of the 55th Westmoreland Regiment); in his 86th year. — Private Interment.
Press, 25 June 1920, Page 6

The death occurred at his residence, Wai-iti road, Timaru, on Wednesday, of Captain Edwyn Frederick Temple, formerly of Castlewood near Geraldine, He was the son of Colonel John Temple Hants, England, where Captain Temple was born in 1835. He joined the 55th Regiment, saw service in India and went through the Crimean war. Captain Temple resigned from tho service in 1870, and came to New Zealand in 1879 in the ship Rangitikei, and landed at Lyttelton. For two years he remained in Christchurch. and then went to Castlewood, where he resided for many years. Captain Temple was an artist of repute, and while residing in Christchurch (says the "Timaru Herald"), he helped to found the Canterbury Society of Arts.

Surname Temple 
Forenames Edwyn 
Date of Death Thursday, 24 June 1920
Date of Interment Thursday, 24 June 1920
Cemetery Timaru Cemetery 
Section General 
Photo of headstone online
Captain Edwyn F. Temple
H.M. 55th Regt.
Crimea - India

Davis, Sydney Herbert

Oamaru Mail, 16 February 1915, Page 4
 Press Association. Dunedin, February 16. The death is announced of Captain Sydney Herbert Davis, a Crimean and Maori war veteran, who also served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War and was wounded at Gettysburg. He continued to serve until General Lee's surrender in 1865. Mr Davis was aged 77 years.

Auckland Star, 16 February 1915, Page 2
WAR VETERAN'S DEATH. DUNEDIN, this day. The death is announced of Captain Sydney Herbert Davies, aged 77, a Crimean and Maori war veteran. He also served in the Confederate Army during the American civil war, and was wounded at Gettysburg. He continued to serve until Lee surrendered in 1865.

Surname DAVIES
Age 76 Years
Date of Death 15 Feb 1915
Funeral Director Hugh Gourley Ltd, Grant Street, DUNEDIN
Location Block 114. Plot 21
Date of Burial 17 Feb 1915

Saturday, March 16, 2013

Carson, James

James Carson

James Carson, son of Robert and Ann Carson of Edenderry, was born on the 15th August 1823, near the town of Lisburn, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland. He worked as a weaver before enlisting with the British Army at Belfast, in 1844.

James, with his wife Mary and daughter Ann, traveled to India as a private with the 57th Regiment of Foot (The Diehards). The regiment returned to Dover Castle, England in 1846, and later saw service in Leeds, Enniskillen, Armagh, Dublin, and Kilkenny.In 1853 they were sent to the Ionian Islands in the Mediterranean, and were ready for action after the Battle of the Alma, which took place on the Crimean Peninsula.

The 57th Regiment arrived at Sebastopol in September 1854, and fought at the Crimea for the remainder of the war. James Carson was present at the battles of Sebastopol, Balaclava and Inkermann, for which service he was later presented with medals and clasps. The regiment remained in the Mediterranean at Corfu and Malta, and it was during this period that James was invalided back to England, suffering from an eye disease, which many of the soldiers had contracted due to the climatic conditions.

He came before the Medical Board at Kilmainham Hospital, Dublin in 1858, and received his discharge as “unfit for duty” later that year. From this date he was registered as a Chelsea Pensioner, first receiving his pension from the depot at Manchester, England.

At the age of 42, with his wife and family of three, he traveled by train from Ashton-under-Lyne, to Glasgow, Scotland, where they boarded the ship “Resolute” for passage to New Zealand. Although the immigrants were destined to populate land in the Waikato, James and Mary did not wait to take up their land grant, but instead sailed on to Wellington.

Ann Carson, their eldest daughter, who had married a soldier in the 57th Regiment while the family were in Malta, had arrived in New Zealand in 1861, when the regiment were sent from India, to take part in the conflict over land settlements in Taranaki.

In 1865, Ann’s husband, Sergeant-Major Robert Fraser, was in charge of the Cuba Street Barracks in Wellington and it is very likely that the two families wished to be re-united.
As a military settler, James continued to draw his pension when he joined the Veteran Corps of the Volunteers in Wellington, serving for 4½ years.

During this period he was recruiting men on behalf of St John Braningan, and Col. Reader of the Armed Constabulary. The family were living in Tinakori Road, and later in Parliament Street.

James Carson fell while stepping down from the tram at the corner of Willis and Manners Streets, and was taken to Wellington Hospital suffering from a broken hip.

He died in hospital 3 days later, on the 1st July 1890, and was buried in the Mount Street cemetery.
by Lynda Richards


 This photo was taken at Terrace End Cemetery, Palmerston North and is the headstone on the grave of James and Mary Carson's son, James Henry Carson.
Private James Carson's grave at Mt Street cemetery, Wellington no longer has a marker.

Sunday, January 27, 2013

Schaw, Henry

Major-General Schaw, formerly of the Royal Engineers, died in Wellington on Wednesday, aged 73. He served in the Crimea, and occupied several important military positions at Home when he retired in 1887. He was Inspector-General of Fortifications, and Secretary of the Royal Defence Committee. Some years ago he advised the Government of New Zealand on the defence of the colony. The cause of death was heart disease.
Press, Volume LIX, Issue 11353, 16 August 1902, Page 7

death registered 1902/5131 Schaw, Henry aged 74 years

Richards, Thomas

The death is announced of Mr. Thomas Richards, for the last 21 years parish clerk and bellringer at St. Peter's Church, which occurred this, morning. Deceased was a native of Kent, and was born in 1833. He served an apprenticeship in London as a cabinetmaker and joiner, and on the outbreak of the Crimea war enlisted in the Royal Engineers, and went through all the hardships of the great campaign. He arrived in this colony in the ship Caroline in 1875, Nelson being the port where he landed with his family of five daughters and one son. Mr. Richards was an authority on campanology, being a member of the College Youth Society of Bellringers, London, and his advice was much sought after in connection with bell-hanging and bell- ringing. For many years he was a member of the Wellington Guards, and at the time of his death he was on the reserve list. His family, however, do not wish for a military funeral, and he will accordingly be buried quietly at Karon tomorrow afternoon, a short service being held in St. Peter's Church on the way to the cemetery.

Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 148, 19 December 1901, Page 4